CTG News - Summer 2013 - Celebrating 50 years of sensor design & manufacture

Primary Productivity Monitoring in the Antarctic using Chelsea FastOcean FRRf System

 

Liquid Robotics names Chelsea as technology partner for hydrocarbon monitoring sensors

 

Institute of Oceanology Chinese Academy of Sciences takes delivery of second oceanographic vehicle

Primary Productivity Monitoring in the Antarctic using Chelsea FastOcean FRRf System   Liquid Robotics names Chelsea as technology partner for hydrocarbon monitoring sensors   China takes delivery of second Chelsea oceanographic vehicle
Professor Andrew McMinn and his team from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania have been using a Chelsea FastOcean Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer (FRRf) to gain an insight into primary production, photosynthesis and photosynthetic health in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic. His most recent deployments unearthed some new and interesting results relating to the physiological adaptations of Antarctic phytoplankton surviving in almost complete darkness under the East Antarctic sea ice. Read full article.  
Chelsea is delighted to be working with Liquid Robotics as their technology partner for hydrocarbon sensors,” said Dr Brian Phillips, Chelsea’s Managing Director. “For the last two years we have been working with Liquid Robotics to provide them with a number of UV AquaTracka Hydrocarbon Sensors for integration into their Wave Gliders®.”  The UV AquaTracka has long been the  industry standard for hydrocarbon detection, a reputation proven during the Macondo Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico.    
Read full article.
 

The Institute of Oceanology Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOCAS), Qingdao, has just taken delivery of a Chelsea SeaSoar towed oceanographic system. The sale has been facilitated through Chelsea’s agents China ORES Co Ltd.  The purchase of the SeaSoar system satisfy the requirement of the IOCAS for a  large payload towed oceanographic vehicle capable of undulating down to depths of 500 metres at tow speeds of up to 12 knots.
Read full article.


Chelsea is working to stop ballast water stowaways

 

Chelsea supplies water monitors for ship exhaust gas cleaning systems

 

Chelsea hydrophone arrays used to study reaction of fish to sound

Chelsea is working to stop ocean stowaways - ballast water monitoring
 
  Chelsea supplies water monitors for ship exhaust gas cleaning systemsring    Chelsea hydrophone used in fish study   
  
Ballast water is critical to the safe operation of ocean-going vessels. However, during ballast water exchange, thousands of aquatic organisms can stowaway and be transported from one part of the world to another. The transfer of these organisms in ships' ballast water can have devastating effects on the marine environment.  "We are working with both manufacturers of ballast water treatment systems and the certification authorities responsible for the formulation of testing criteria, to develop sensors capable of operating at the IMO level of compliance", said Richard Burt. Read full article.     "To comply with International Maritime Organization environmental regulations, global shipping is required to meet specific exhaust gas emission levels," said Chelsea's Richard Burt. "These will become even more stringent in the next few years. Chelsea is supplying sensor systems as an integral part of exhaust gas cleaning systems to continuously monitor their performance. We have systems installed in both new ship builds and retrofit systems. This work expands our existing capability in the supply of in-line monitoring systems to the maritime sector." Read full article.      

"Chelsea's hydrophone arrays are being used by the Institute of Marine Research in Bergen to study the reactions of fish to sound," reports acoustics specialist Paul Bolton.  “Three custom designed, 8m long, active hydrophone arrays are now being used to map the sound field inside a fish pen at Austevoll, just south of  Bergen. The reactions of a school of herring to waterborne acoustic signals and noise of various types is currently being studied to get a better understanding of the environmental impact human-made noise can have on fish." Read full article.


Chelsea announces sale of another Echo Repeater Acoustics System for export

 

SeaSoar undulating oceanographic recorders in service with UK Royal Navy

 

Chelsea delivers further Sonar 2115 oceanographic sensor for RN Astute submarine

boat-n-sub
 
  navyseasoar
 
  2115
 
 
Chelsea  is pleased to announce the sale of another Echo Repeater Acoustics Source (ERAS) system for export. "ERAS is a compact and versatile acoustic system for the performance evaluation of a wide range of active and passive sonars," said Chelsea's Richard Burt. "It will be used by the customer as a hand held, portable system from small vessels in remote locations.  ERAS is extremely attractive to users due to its relative low cost, small size and light weight. 
Read full article. 
 
When most people think of warships, they think big guns, missiles and helicopters. But for hydrographic vessels the most important systems they carry aren’t necessarily their weapons, but their state-of-the-art underwater survey suites. Four SeaSoar undulating oceanographic recorders (UORs) are currently in use on the Royal Navy’s survey vessels, HMS ECHO and HMS ENTERPRISE. These UORs are towed behind the ships and collect a vast range of information using highly advanced oceanographic sensors.  Read full article.
 
 
Chelsea has delivered a further Sonar 2115 oceanographic sensor system for HMS AUDACIOUS, the fourth Royal Navy Astute class submarine. This follows the successful delivery of systems for HMS ASTUTE, HMS AMBUSH and HMS ARTFUL. A separate system has also been installed at the Shore Based Integration Facility. The oceanographic sensors are designed to provide improved situational awareness and enhanced knowledge of the ocean environment. Read full article.

Dean James, University of Oxford, awarded prize for best poster from Chelsea's Dr John Attridge

 

Advances in Sea-State Forecasting using Chelsea Sensor

 

Chelsea appoints Unique System FZE as representative in the United Arab Emirates 

Dean James, University of Oxford, awarded prize for best poster from Chelsea's Dr John Attridge    Dean James, University of Oxford, awarded prize for best poster from Chelsea's Dr John Attridge   Dean James, University of Oxford, awarded prize for best poster from Chelsea's Dr John Attridge
Chelsea's Technical Director Dr John Attridge was delighted to present the prize for best poster to Dean James (University of Oxford) at the "Microfluidics and Microsensor Sensor Technology for Oceanographic and Environmental Science Applications" workshop held during Ocean Business.   Dean's poster was entitled "Sensitive analysis of trace chemical species in seawater via cavity-enhanced spectroscopy". Read full article. 
 

 “Wave conditions are always changing and can vary tremendously over a period of a few hours”, said Chelsea’s Technical Manager, Paul Bolton. “Operators need to know what current conditions are before commencing an operation or lives could be put at risk”.  Sensors and electronics, provided by Chelsea have just been installed onboard RV Callista, the University of Southampton’s research vessel and are now collecting real-time wave data. Read full article.

  Unique System FZE, one of the world’s leading integrated turnkey subsea and offshore solution providers, has been appointed representative for Chelsea's products in the UAE.  “Unique System FZE is an ideal choice to represent us”, said Chelsea’s Justin Dunning. “They have over 20 years’ experience servicing the maritime, diving and petroleum sectors in the Middle East through equipment sales and rentals.” Read full article.

 
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